"Working with him, he’s such a gentle man. He’s in his mid-60’s and he gives more than any of the young guys. He’s kicking ass; all night shoots, all exteriors. Chain smoking like a fiend. Just on coffee. And with the big, giant glasses that see everything. He says he’s deaf out of one ear, I don’t know if that’s a trick or what, just to be able to listen in on everybody ‘cause he always hears everything and catches you.", via horrorharbour.

(Source: jamesbadgedale)

Romero and Argento, on the set of Dawn Of The Dead (1978)
The history of Dawn of the Dead began in 1974, when Romero was invited by friend Mark Mason, of Oxford Development Company, to visit the Monroeville Mall, which Mason’s company managed. After showing Romero hidden parts of the mall, during which Romero noted the bliss of the consumers, Mason jokingly suggested that someone would be able to survive in the mall should an emergency ever occur. With this inspiration, Romero began to write the screenplay for the film. (via)

Romero and Argento, on the set of Dawn Of The Dead (1978)

The history of Dawn of the Dead began in 1974, when Romero was invited by friend Mark Mason, of Oxford Development Company, to visit the Monroeville Mall, which Mason’s company managed. After showing Romero hidden parts of the mall, during which Romero noted the bliss of the consumers, Mason jokingly suggested that someone would be able to survive in the mall should an emergency ever occur. With this inspiration, Romero began to write the screenplay for the film. (via)

Just another day at the mall in Dawn of the Dead (1978, dir. George A. Romero) (via)
Q. Your zombies have always walked with a meandering shuffle, but modern zombies seem to be becoming more aerobic. Why is that?
George A. Romero: I think it’s video games, man. Zombies are always moving fast in video games. It makes sense if you think about it. Those games are all about hand-eye coordination and how quickly can you get them before they get you. So the zombies have to keep coming at you, crawling over the walls and across the ceiling.
Zombies are perfect for a first-person shooter game, because they exist to be damaged…Filmmakers saw what was happening in video games and started thinking, “Well, we’ve got to keep pace and make our zombies fast too.”
I still don’t agree with it. If zombies are dead, how can they move fast? My guys don’t run. They never have and they never will. They’re just lumbering oafs that are easy to dispose of unless you make a mistake. Those are the rules, and I’ll stick with what I’ve got. (via), via oldhollywood.

Just another day at the mall in Dawn of the Dead (1978, dir. George A. Romero) (via)

Q. Your zombies have always walked with a meandering shuffle, but modern zombies seem to be becoming more aerobic. Why is that?

George A. Romero: I think it’s video games, man. Zombies are always moving fast in video games. It makes sense if you think about it. Those games are all about hand-eye coordination and how quickly can you get them before they get you. So the zombies have to keep coming at you, crawling over the walls and across the ceiling.

Zombies are perfect for a first-person shooter game, because they exist to be damaged…Filmmakers saw what was happening in video games and started thinking, “Well, we’ve got to keep pace and make our zombies fast too.”

I still don’t agree with it. If zombies are dead, how can they move fast? My guys don’t run. They never have and they never will. They’re just lumbering oafs that are easy to dispose of unless you make a mistake. Those are the rules, and I’ll stick with what I’ve got. (via), via oldhollywood.

There is no explicit sex in this picture. However, there are scenes of violence which may be considered shocking.
Dawn Of The Dead, 1978

There is no explicit sex in this picture.
However, there are scenes of violence which may be considered shocking.

Dawn Of The Dead, 1978

Dawn Of The Dead, 1978
Many of the extras cast in the film, especially the zombies in close-up shots, were friends and relatives of the production crew.

Dawn Of The Dead, 1978

Many of the extras cast in the film, especially the zombies in close-up shots, were friends and relatives of the production crew.